3D printed subs ?

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  • cheapsub
    Member
    • Feb 2011
    • 196

    #46
    New model 3D printer from China.


    Print you sub in one goes, may be until V3.5.

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    • X Bubblehead
      Member
      • Sep 2017
      • 59

      #47
      If you print a lot of rectangles, this may be the ideal printer.

      Organic shapes and rounded profiles? I don't think so. For a rounded hull with minimal print lines you want a bed that only moves in Z (up and down) not forwards and back like the majority of sub-$1000 hobbyist printers that are saturating the market. You want the part to remain as still as possible to get the highest quality and least amount of sanding post-print. Additionally, high-temp filaments like ASA and ABS require an enclosed volume for best results.

      The old adage holds true with 3D printing: You get what you pay for.

      I just ordered another one of these last week and it's ideal for submarine hulls: https://www.raise3d.com/pro2-plus/

      CC

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      • salmon
        Treasurer
        • Jul 2011
        • 2304

        #48
        X Bubblehead, wow nice printer.
        If you can cut, drill, saw, hit things and swear a lot, you're well on the way to building a working model sub.

        Comment

        • X Bubblehead
          Member
          • Sep 2017
          • 59

          #49
          Thanks.

          Raise3D offers a streamlined, integrated 3D solution. They also write the slicer software - ideaMaker; it's free, intuitive, and receives regular updates --mostly from user inputs. It works on a variety of popular 3Dprinters.

          Available for free here: https://www.raise3d.com/ideamaker/

          Their camera, (used for monitoring prints in real-time) isn't useful for much more than letting you know if there's a problem. The printer build quality is very good, and the 7" touch screen monitor mirrors what you see in ideaMaker.

          The build volume is massive. An entire boat with a 4" diameter can be printed in one (long) shot. 70-hour prints are effortless. I've been running one nearly non-stop since June for a wide variety of projects.

          If the machine runs out of filament, it lowers the bed, and waits for a new roll, then picks right up where it left off. - The same applies to power interruptions. Raise3D has an identical, half-height printer that is $2000 cheaper. There is minimal vibration transmitted to the part being printed - the 1" leadscrews that lower the bed see to that. 50 micron accuracy ensures I can press-fit components with nearly invisible seams, and as I mentioned above, the barely visible layer lines require minimal sanding - the bane of smoothing 3D printed models.

          While this printer is total overkill for casual 3D printing needs, for serious production work, it's a really good option.

          Being able to design and print my own submarine models is very rewarding. I've got a MK-VIII SDV printing as I type. Total print time is around 50 hours, --depending on how much infill I use. It should be ready by Monday, just in time for my second version, which I'm modeling now.

          It's nice to see more and more people getting involved with 3D printing; it has the potential to bring many new converts into the RC printing world. I love a good GRP hull as much as anyone, but the price (and limited availability of the boats I'm interested in) severely limits the number of prospective new members.

          I use PLA for prototyping and fit-checks, but ASA has the properties required for a worry-free user experience.

          Enjoy!

          CC
          Last edited by X Bubblehead; 11-13-2020, 08:50 PM.

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