3D printed subs ?

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  • Sonnich
    Junior Member
    • Jul 2017
    • 66

    3D printed subs ?

    Anyone 3d print their submarine ?
    There seems to be a lot of 3d models of submarines out there, that can be modified for RC use. Seems like an "easy" way to get a nice scale submarine outline.
    This LA class Flight I , is printed in ABS. PLA plastic would be just as good I imagine ?
    How thick a hull would be best in plastic ? 4mm ?
    I was thinking of making a PVC sewer pipe WTC for it.
    Attached Files
  • SubtechRC
    SubCommittee Vendor Member
    • Feb 2017
    • 77

    #2
    I've found that a printed wall thickness of about. .080" works well. Set your infill at 15%. It does not need to be a solid wall profile. PLA (polylactic acid) does not do well immersed. It softens and degrades. Use ABS for best hull results. PLA can be used as internal ballast system components in the dry space with no trouble.

    There are many free 3D models of subs out there. You typically get what you pay for. Most of them are terribly inaccurate and the CAD work is strictly bush league. Also, most files are STEP or STL files which are a royal pain to manipulate. Look for files that provide you with the iges file for surfaces. NURBs surfaces are best generated with Rhino 5 3D or Solidworks.
    Last edited by SubtechRC; 07-30-2017, 12:02 PM.
    Best Regards,

    Matt

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    • Sonnich
      Junior Member
      • Jul 2017
      • 66

      #3
      THanks, Ill try that :-)

      Comment

      • bob the builder
        Former SC President
        • Feb 2003
        • 1361

        #4
        It's more work than you think. I've done a few models now using 3D printing for masters. You'll need to do a lot of post-production cleanup, filling, sanding, etc. If you're after quick and dirty, this will work well. If you're hoping for polished parts you glue together and go with... it's not happening (yet!).

        Bob
        The Nautilus Drydocks - Exceptional Products for the World of R/C Submarines - www.nautilusdrydocks.com

        Comment

        • aeroengineer1
          Junior Member
          • May 2005
          • 241

          #5
          Haha, I had to laugh at the thought of SolidWorks being considered as a good surface modeler. It can do OK surfaces, especially for the RC sub community as they usually are not that complex, but it ranks low on ability to generate accurate surfaces, and it has few tools to tell you how good or bad they are. Do not get me wrong, I love SolidWorks, and I have used it for years, and know many of its workarounds. I have not played with Rhino, but I hear really good things about it. Best surface modeler I have used (5 total CAD packages so far) is CATIA. Though with CATIA, you have to promise your first born, your house, and have the financial backing of a small country to afford it

          Comment

          • SubtechRC
            SubCommittee Vendor Member
            • Feb 2017
            • 77

            #6
            Its good to see you posting again, Adam! I hope all is well with you and your family.
            Last edited by SubtechRC; 08-01-2017, 12:28 AM.
            Best Regards,

            Matt

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            • Sonnich
              Junior Member
              • Jul 2017
              • 66

              #7
              Thanks for the tips. I have to start somewhere :-) Im not looking at building scale winning competition subs, just something that will work :-)
              I have had a robbe Seawolf long time ago, that I had to sell. it was a fun little dynamic diver boat. I also have an unfinished Robbe U-47. Would like to make it a static diver.....but im a bit stuck on that one at the moment. I bought a 3d printer last year....and that is almost a hobby by itself. 3 months ago I boght a larger printer, and that can print larger stuff.....like sub parts, and rc plane stuff :-)
              Yesterday I received a arkmodel red shark. its in the build section. Going to try it out today hopefully :-)

              Here is some of the stuff I have printed out. I would say it is fine enough to print detaild stuff on a sub.
              Attached Files

              Comment

              • Sonnich
                Junior Member
                • Jul 2017
                • 66

                #8
                few more.....
                Attached Files

                Comment

                • scottyk
                  Junior Member
                  • Jul 2017
                  • 12

                  #9
                  Where do you find the free files for the RC subs at? Worth a look!

                  Comment

                  • Sonnich
                    Junior Member
                    • Jul 2017
                    • 66

                    #10
                    Here is a few :-)

                    lots more out there.
                    Some need some work with the STL`s to make them work.


                    This is a model or a Pre-I SSN688 Class (Los Angeles Class) fast attack sub. The outline for the model came from the 688 Wiki page so it's not very accurate and is missing a LOT of details. I have uploaded a complete hull model as well as sectioned pieces if you are space constrained on your printer. I made one about 2 ft long on a Makerbot Replicator 2X using .3mm layer height, 10% infill and 2 perimeters. I glued the sections together with an acetone/ABS paste-like slurry. I used http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:287026 as a propeller. I merged the tailcone with the propeller and printed them as one piece. The model was created in SW2013.




                    Michael Curry's awesome Submarine U-Boat, recombined and resliced to be printed in two pieces. Pre-scaled for RepRap and Ultimaker. If you have a double-height Ultimaker, grab the "GIANT" file, 510 mm tall. enjoy.


                    This is the I-401 one of the only 3 Sen-teku I-400 class submarines that were build for the japanese imperial navy under the commands of your emperor, Hirohito. The I-400 sisters were a included into a master plan of the japanese empire, that was to sail the three subs to the panama's channel, in order to destroy it and cut the onlyway of USA and europe easy access from atlantic to pacific ocean. There are two bases you can download, the # 1 is a bit more fancy one because only holds its weight from one pillar, but you will need to print it fully solid. The submarine model is not mine (obviously), it was made by the sketchup user: The Architect, so it would be good if youconsider support him/her. but the bases are made by me ( consider support...... ... ... nah just kidding)


                    K-141 Kursk was a Russian Oscar II -class nuclear powered submarine capable of carrying 24 cruise missiles and 24 torpedoes. She was one of the first vessels to be taken into Russian military service after the collapse of the Soviet Union, served for 5 years in the Northern Fleet before tragically sinking during an exercise into the depths of Barents sea on August 2000 with the loss of all hands. It was later discovered that she sunk due to series of explosions, first of which was most probably caused by the hydrogen peroxide used as a propellant in the old Soviet torpedoes and subsequently detonating kerosene and other armaments on board. While 23 of the 118 personnel survived the explosions, delayed rescue operations led to rest of the crew suffocating. Even with this tragic story, or perhaps because of it, who doesn't want to have a nuclear submarine on the desk? I think submarines are interesting. They are somewhat like mysterious underwater predators, gliding calmly below the surface in total silence, unseen and hardly detectable. Once I noticed the #MakeItFloat challenge I started thinking something different to participate with than regular boats so I decided to combine a little bit of history into the competition. Later when I figured out I could actually do this, I wanted to add more details and it kind of spiraled from a simple display model to fully functional RC vessel. This is the second ever "multi part" model I've made and let's just say it's been a rough ride through Youtube tutorials and online manuals :) But I'm proud of what I've accomplished already in terms of learning. Honestly, I didn't think I'd get even the hull done when I started. I've also made lots of calculations for buoyancy and carrying capacity, this model does float and is able to move powered by a small motor (or dual motors), turn with rudder and stay in balance with the side planes. There is also a compartment for counterweights in the bow to further balance the vessel when motor and rudder controls are fitted to the stern. The biggest challenges for me were, as mentioned above, first learning how to use the software properly to design such a complex model with lots of detail. Secondly I struggled with fitting all the RC components inside, as there really is not too much room in the hull and I wanted to keep the original dimensions so widening the hull wasn't an option. I also have zero experience of RC boats so figuring out how to make rudder turn etc were something that took me many hours to complete. I also wanted to combine a few different materials to make it more reliable and at the same time more fun to build, so each opening in the hull is meant to be sealed with parts printed out from NinjaFlex or similar flexible material to keep water out from inside the hull. 19th Jul.Version 2.0 is out! Dive! Dive! Dive! The newest revision allows you to add components necessary to make this thing go underwater. This was something I dreamed of accomplishing when I started this build, and now it's here. Diving mechanism is made as cheap as possible, consisting of 2 x 30ml medical syringes acting as a piston ballast, fitted with a small motor and a leadscrew to push/pull the plunger. Water intake comes from the bottom of the main hull. Now it goes without saying but taking this vessel underwater is a task that requires lots of care in printing quality, sealing all the possible leaking points. As RC controlled you may also encounter some issues with radiowaves not penetrating deep enough to the water, so make sure your radio operates in a wavelength that can be used in submersible applications. Cheap-o alternative is to wire the RC components into a buoy and let that float on the water surface, connected to the submarines motors via wiring. To make this dive, you need to carefully measure the weight of the whole assembly without water in the ballast, then fill in with coins or similar and measure the point where it sunk. Remove ~40g from the sinking point and you're golden with the ballast system filling in total of 60ml of water (~60g). The files for this revision are available in a simple .zip file named as 2.0 DiveKit. All the rest of the parts are similar to v1.5 so it's easy to upgrade to this version even if you already started printing the 1.5. Main differences in the divekit are the mounting points for the ballast system, and removed missile bays from the main hull to get more room to fit battery etc inside the vessel if needed. This is very experimental proof-of-concept build and v1.5 should be still considered as the default build, I just fail at version numbering ;) With this I will also remove the work-in-progress stamp from this project and consider this finally complete. 5th Jul. Updated files for the current revision.Version 1.5 is out! Short intro video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3hakm56Ei0 This revision comes in two flavors! RC-version with all the interior parts for mounting electronics and a pure display version which has all the interior parts shaved off to save in printing time and materials while providing detailed model to be put on shelf. Choose your pick and print away! All files are checked with netfabb, oriented and ready to print. What's new: Added lots of more details Easier to print, easier to assemble! Two versions: RC-ready and Display-only. Zip files provide easy way to download all the necessary files for either model with one click. Pre-split taller parts to make them fit smaller build spaces. Fixed many dimensions to match original Kursk with more precision. Fixed many small gaps and too thin walls. Tested with electronics, added servo mounts, finished pushrods, motor mounts etc. Fixed missile bay hatch mounting. Added PDF instructions for assembling. Added fastening features for maintenance hatches. Three different propeller types for the best thrust with whatever RPM your motor provides. Stand for the model. Added .STEP file for easier modification of the model. And lots more! 20th Jun.Version 1.0 Intro video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JzcrmXRq10 Added datasheet with full measurements of cargo capacity and dimensions as jpeg. Testing was done by filling the hull with euro coins. Optimal swimming depth is achieved by adding 9eur in 20cent coins + 1eur in 10cent coins. (295,79g in more logical units ;) Vessel sunk after adding additional 100g weight (I ran out of coins) and 4 x 10cent coins. Total cargo weight that caused the sinking was therefore 408.09g Mandatory obvious disclaimer: Electricity + water do not mix. I'm not responsible for any damages or injuries caused. Please make sure that water is not leaking inside the model before fitting any electric components. If in doubt, at least enclose your electronics to small plastic bags or similar to prevent damage. You know, the obvious :)








                    A model of a military submarine propeller. Entirely original, speculative work. Is not meant to be a facsimile of any specific impeller of any particular real / existent submarine model or class. I don't have the knowledge or talent / experience to accurately model a specific submarine's prop.


                    A model of a military submarine propeller. Entirely original, speculative work. Is not meant to be a facsimile of any specific impeller of any particular real / existent submarine model or class. I don't have the knowledge or talent / experience to accurately model a specific submarine's prop.


                    This is a RC submarine that I am building. All plastic parts are done and I am sharing them for whoever would like to build one like this. The Hull is a 4" abs pipe from hardware store.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No real world experience with 3D printers, just observed some results. The domestic models seem to have come on in recent times, although still seem to be some way from the results achievable with professional machines used by the bureaus.

                      Ideally you ought to aim for minimum thickness on any items above the waterline, as high volume equates to big tanks if the boat incorporates a ballast system. I've also heard that PLA is a swine to sand, so not sure how easy it would be to get a good finish. ABS can be tricky to print I believe, but would probably be a better choice for hand finishing, and should stand up to the elements.

                      Personally I think at this point in time 3D printing is a good tool for making details, and possibly masters to cast off for larger components. There some manufacturers out there which are using composites for additive manufacturing, e.g. Markforged but still early days, and it isn't cheap.

                      When that gains some traction, we could see some interesting products.

                      Comment

                      • aeroengineer1
                        Junior Member
                        • May 2005
                        • 241

                        #12
                        Thanks Matt,

                        Things are going well. Life has been busy for sure, but I am starting to work more on mechanical things now. I am still heavily involved with electronics (I have this hobby to thank for that), so it will be a bit before I really dig back in. You going to be in Indy here Saturday? It is about an hour and a half for me, but I have to stop by the Dayton Mini Maker Faire before I head out.

                        Originally posted by SubtechRC View Post
                        Its good to see you posting again, Adam! I hope all is well with you and your family.

                        Comment

                        • aeroengineer1
                          Junior Member
                          • May 2005
                          • 241

                          #13
                          I have just started to get into 3D printing. I have been playing mostly with PLA, but you can use Polystyrene as well, though it is mostly considered as a support material. ABS for chlorinated water is probably the best for the application, but it can be challenging to print. I have yet to play with it, but my little 3D printer will soon be upgraded with a heated bed to better use ABS materials. As for sanding PLA, I have found it a nice material to work with. It has a more crystalline structure which allows for nice filing. The bigger concern is its low heat deflection temperature. There are some PLA blends that raise this temperature, but it is really something to watch. Also PLA is worse in chlorinated water than Polystyrene. That being said, I have a batch that I printed that I have exposed to an extreme dose of chlorine, and it has been immersed for about a month now and it has not gotten particularly brittle, but it is leaching out all the color.

                          I also am making it so that I can mount a 405nm laser on this printer so that I can etch plastic as well as use it to expose photosensitive UV resist for photo etch brass. This will eventually be built into a ~2m long rig that will have a print bed that can accommodate a build volume of about 10" x 10" x 12", and have a 4 axis laser engraver.

                          The goal will be to be able to print a boat in sections, then do the handworking of the surfaces. After that, then mount it in the 4th axis and engrave the hull details. This could be used to make masters, skipping the intermediate steps, and thus the cost associated with it, and be able to go straight to having a fully detailed mold master ready for creating a set of tooling. The other way it could be used is to just build a one off and go from there.

                          Adam

                          Originally posted by sub culture View Post
                          No real world experience with 3D printers, just observed some results. The domestic models seem to have come on in recent times, although still seem to be some way from the results achievable with professional machines used by the bureaus.

                          Ideally you ought to aim for minimum thickness on any items above the waterline, as high volume equates to big tanks if the boat incorporates a ballast system. I've also heard that PLA is a swine to sand, so not sure how easy it would be to get a good finish. ABS can be tricky to print I believe, but would probably be a better choice for hand finishing, and should stand up to the elements.

                          Personally I think at this point in time 3D printing is a good tool for making details, and possibly masters to cast off for larger components. There some manufacturers out there which are using composites for additive manufacturing, e.g. Markforged but still early days, and it isn't cheap.

                          When that gains some traction, we could see some interesting products.

                          Comment

                          • SubtechRC
                            SubCommittee Vendor Member
                            • Feb 2017
                            • 77

                            #14
                            Adam,
                            That is being done in my shop now with 2 new models. Both printed in PLA. 1/48th Russian WWII Pike and 1/48th American S-25. My machines are all 3 axis so I will still be hand scribing in the fine details.
                            Best Regards,

                            Matt

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                            Comment

                            • Sonnich
                              Junior Member
                              • Jul 2017
                              • 66

                              #15
                              Just printed this one for my father...he is a huge Beatles fan :-)

                              A shame that the 3d model is not smoother...but some filler and sandig will take care of it.

                              But even this model could be scaled up, and made RC :-)
                              Attached Files

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